There aren’t actually very many temporary architectural works dedicated to the hospitality business, but all of them have a unique ‘it’ factor: perhaps the very idea of actually hosting someone unleashes the designers’ creativity (and their marketing vocation too), so that in some cases the end-product is memorable.
The Temple of Agape is a temporary installation created by Morag Myerscough and Luke Morgan that is designed to welcome visitors to the ‘Festival of Love’ in Queenswalk, London.
In Greek ‘Agape’ means ‘love for humanity’ and it is one of the seven themes ancient Greeks dedicated to this sentiment.

The challenge for Myerscough & Morgan was to avoid the commonplace, the obvious and ‘done before’. The result is a whirlwind of color and slogans, a structure so irregular as to appear almost normal, flourishing with shapes and changes of direction.
An impromptu, powerful temple, with clear traces of post-Woodstock rock album graphics, from a time when the peace & love culture was dominant and oriental contamination all-pervasive.

The Temple of Agape greets visitors brashly and insolently: it’s 8 m [26 ft] tall and 12 m [39 ft] wide, and is installed on a scaffolding which supports its wooden panels decorated with hundreds of words.
Visitors who see the Temple of Agape don’t necessarily enter the Festival: such is the force of this architectural solution devoted exclusively to welcoming them, temporary but powerful.

Matteo De Bartolomeis

Matteo De Bartolomeis

Born in Milan, a career in professional publishing with a significant interlude in behavioral and methodology training. He went digital and experienced first-hand the birth and rise of the internet, working in IT publishing in the 1990s. Has been working for 12 years with and for Suite magazine and on b2b publishing projects for the contract and hotel industry, with special focus on the international evolution of design, on trends and transformations in the relevant markets and the role of social media in the industry.